Annual Report 2011 - 2012

Key Milestones: 2011 - 2012

  • 30+ countries benefitting from GAIN support
  • 53% of beneficiaries in Africa
  • 46% of beneficiaries in Asia
  • 667 million people reached with more nutritious foods
  • Including 321 million women and children
  • US$ 0.22 cost per target individual reached across GAIN projects

Joint Letter From Jay Naidoo &
Marc Van Ameringen

Nutrition on the Rise

GAIN turned ten years old this year.

When GAIN was founded in 2002, nutrition seemed marooned in the doldrums of development. Not only did spending on other sectors eclipse the small amount invested in nutrition, the world knew very little about nutrition's critical role in human development. Since then, the global community has paid increasing attention to nutrition; nevertheless, malnutrition has only declined by ten percent in the past two decades, or about half a percentage point each year. To put that number in perspective, tuberculosis-related deaths have been reduced by 40 percent since 1990, and malaria-related deaths by 25 percent since 2000. The consequences of underinvestment have been devastating: today, 180 million children suffer from stunting (low height for age).

Nevertheless, we are optimistic - nutrition is gaining ground. While we remain shocked by the sheer number of our two billion fellow citizens who remain undernourished, our ability to tackle this problem has never been better.

Jay Naidoo, Chairman, GAIN Board
Marc Van Ameringen, Executive Director, GAIN

Read the full letter

Nutrition on the Rise - Five Challenges

  1. Building innovative partnerships for delivery

    It is only by reshaping food systems to deliver a more diverse, nutritious and affordable diet that we will eliminate malnutrition. To this end, we will harness skills, resources, and leadership from every part of the nutrition value chain - from smallholder farmers to large multinationals, to governments and civil society.

  2. Increasing investments in nutrition by identifying new financing mechanisms, reforming markets, and building political will to create an effective enabling environment

    We are working actively with our donors to ramp up their investment in nutrition. We will also ensure that practices, taxes and tariffs are regulated to help, not hinder good nutrition. GAIN will use its Business Alliance as a learning and knowledge platform to support new delivery and partnership models in areas like research and development.

  3. Scaling-up solutions

    Finding solutions that can rapidly and sustainably reach hundreds of millions is our challenge. GAIN will continue to implement evidence-based nutrition interventions at scale - with a particular emphasis on the thousand-days from conception to a child's second birthday - and to integrate nutrition goals into wider national efforts. We will also work with our partners to identify ways to improve dietary diversity and choice for the poorest, who often cannot be reached through pure market channels.

  4. Expanding horizons and repositioning nutrition in global development efforts

    Finding solutions that can rapidly and sustainably reach hundreds of millions is our challenge. GAIN will continue to implement evidence-based nutrition interventions at scale - with a particular emphasis on the thousand-days from conception to a child's second birthday - and to integrate nutrition goals into wider national efforts. We will also work with our partners to identify ways to improve dietary diversity and choice for the poorest, who often cannot be reached through pure market channels.

  5. Listening to and partnering with the poor themselves

    The poorest and those at the margins of society are the least able to redress their health problems. GAIN is looking for ways to collaborate with the poor and organizations that represent them. The goal is to create leaders among the poor, and hold governments and businesses accountable for helping the poor become food secure.

Key Progress Against Targets

Highlighting Areas of Work

Campaigning for Change

Monitoring, Evaluation, Learning and Research

GAIN's investments in monitoring, evaluation, learning, and research (MELR) are fundamental to its success. Our MELR not only supports our decisions to scale-up projects, it also influences key stakeholders to invest more in the fight against malnutrition. Over the last year GAIN has developed a learning agenda, which includes key themes and questions to explore that are crucial to scaling up the impact on malnutrition

Routine program reports on production, distribution and quality control inform GAIN's estimates of our programs' reach and coverage. Surveys of food consumption and of compliance with standards inform assessment of our programs' impact on the nutrition of target groups. Over the year, GAIN supported 15 large-scale micronutrient surveys in countries with active projects.

Our MELR demonstrated that the products and programs deliver nutritional impact. It also identified key elements in the delivery chain that can influence the scale and scope of outcomes.

Financial Report

Total funds received from donors during the year amounted to US$ 33.2 million (2010-11, US$ 13.8 million). Donor income recognized during the year amounted to US$ 43.2 million (2010-11, US$ 39.1 million). Total expenditure during the year was US$ 40.9 million (2010-11, US$ 37.3 million).

Team

* New Members appointed in May 2012

** New Members appointed in December 2011

+ Term completed in May 2012

++ New Members since May 2012

+++ Joined GAIN Board in May 2012

GAIN Program Map

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